May 252010
 

The sun produced a magnetic filament that burst Monday, shooting a “billion-ton” coronal mass ejection (CME) racing towards our planet, according to a post on spaceweather.com.  NOAA projects a 35% chance of geomagnetic activity on May 27th when the CME is expected to hammer Earth’s magnetic field.

In the animated image below, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured the CME speeding away from the sun.  The Pleiades constellation, a star cluster with sinister occult meaning, can be seen drifting overhead.

May 24th, 2010, Coronal Mass Ejection

The May 24th, 2010, coronal mass ejection

It is unproven but probable that CMEs trigger earthquakes.  The fluctuations of Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere resulting from the impact of a coronal mass ejection induce magnetic and electrostatic forces and even produce massive electrical currents on the surface of our planet.  Doubtlessly, these forces are occasionally sufficient to catalyze fault zone slippage, causing earthquakes.

Earlier this year, we reported that the massive 8.8-magnitude earthquake in Chile was predicted several days before it occurred based upon a scheduled CME impact.

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